Review of a Session at the WTFSEO Conference

While obviously you should have been at the excellent WTFSEO conference yesterday, which was attended by all of the brightest and the best in the industry, including every single expert who dropped every piece of proprietary information they had, we’ve written up each of the sessions in excruciating detail so it’s just like you were there.

The moderator for the session was that woman who runs her own agency, she’s not that well known, but she volunteered, and really all she had to do was welcome the audience and get the names of the speakers mostly right, which she did.

The first speaker up was that guy from the hip brand.  His slide deck had a bunch of wacky transitions, a sizzle video for his company, and he’d obviously rehearsed his attempts at humor.  The graphs he used were so small, even on the big screen, that they may as well have been the rainfall totals for Estonia over the 18th century, but he apologized for that and promised that everyone would be able to get a copy of his deck as long as they gave him a business card and signed up for their service.

Up next was that woman from the big brand.  While it may have appeared that sIMG_3553he was reading from a script and didn’t say anything actionable, the cute cat pictures throughout the presentation got lots of oohs and aahs.  She also made a rather snappy, off the cuff comment about the first speaker’s presentation, and then promptly lost her place for a few seconds, but she quickly regained her composure and got back to avoiding saying anything useful about the topic through the medium of mildly amusing felines.  Her presentation was about 5 minutes short, which meant that there’d be more time for Q&A.

The last presenter was the agency guy who spent the first 4 minutes detailing the work that his company does, before moving on to a promotional video for his company and a case study with his company and a client that was loosely tied to the topic.  He then spent the next 5 minutes showing a study from a research company, although it was hard to see which company as he’d superimposed his agency logo over theirs.  Finally he rounded out his presentation, 15 minutes over time, with a series of slides recapping the work his company does, and providing a litany of options to contact his firm, including a link to download the presentation where you just have to input your email address, which automatically opts you in for each of his newsletters.

Unfortunately there was only time for one question from the audience, which had the challenge of the microphone first having to be found, and then turned on after the audience member had started asking.  At this point several members of the audience filtered out so they could get to the front of the boxed lunch line. The question was directed solely at the guy from the hip brand, and wasn’t really related to the topic, but was about that person’s issues with their account on the hip brand.  The guy from the hip brand explained that it wasn’t his area, but he’d take their information and accidentally leave it on the table if they’d like.

The moderator then called for a smattering of applause and the majority of the audience filed out, while some lined up at the podium in the hope of selling their products / services to the speakers.

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